CBLR Fellows 2006-2010

2010 - 2011 Diversity, Equity, & Community Engagement Fellows 


Shauna Carlisle, Ph. D., MSW

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2009-2011
Project: Approaches to Social Research

Shauna Carlisle will use community based learning to teach research methods in partnership with King County Housing Authority (KCHA).  The purpose of this research project is to conduct a customer satisfaction program evaluation of 4,000 units within KCHA’s housing portfolio.  Undergraduate students in her Approaches to Social Research classes will conceptualize, design, and execute all aspects of the research project including: survey development, data collections, data analysis, and dissemination and presentation of findings to King County Housing Authority.  This rigorous course is designed to give students both the theoretical knowledge and hands-on research methods training students will need to execute a well designed research project in the future and to become more critical consumers of research findings.  KCHA executives will attend two classes to introduce the scope of the project and again to listen to student presentations and evaluate the research process.

Susan Harewood, Ph. D.

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2009-2011
Project: Media and Representation

Susan Harewood is using a community based learning approach in developing a graduate course in media and representation. She says that the community based approach will improve student praxis by prompting them to think through the ethical issues of representation defined as ‘standing in for’ and/or ‘making present’ whilst they engage with community organizations to either assist in designing and implementing a community based radical media literacy syllabus or researching media ownership and fairness issues. The students will explore the rewards, challenges and political possibilities of collaboration and community engagement.

Rob Turner, Ph. D.

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2009-2011
Project: Improving the Design, Dissemination, Continuity, and Assessment of Community-Based Research by UW Bothell Students in BES 318 and BIS 490

Dr. Turner has been engaging students in community-based research projects for as long as he has been teaching. This reflects his commitment to provide experiential learning opportunities for students that also provide some benefit to the community. In 2010 Dr. Turner will be incorporating community-based research projects in BES 318 – Hydrogeology, BIS 490 – Senior Seminar: Sustainability Research for Community Enhancement, BIS 392 – Water and Sustainability, and BES 303 – Environmental Monitoring Practicum. His ICBLR proposal is to take the community-based projects in these courses to the next level. Specifically, he will collaborate with the ICBLR Steering Committee and fellows to ensure that: 1) student project results are well packaged and well disseminated; 2) plans for continuing research projects and collaborations beyond 2010 are developed; and 3) student learning objectives are defined and their fulfillment assessed, along with community partner satisfaction.

Jin-Kyu Jung, Ph. D.

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2010-2011
Project: Mapping Communities  

Jung is proposing a project to bring an understanding of “community” through mapping. Maps can be powerful tools to tell stories about communities in which we live, play, work and engage with other people. It helps us to collect, manage, and particularly ‘visualize’ valuable knowledge about the people and places around us. Most up-to-date digital maps on the web and popular geoportal sites such as Google Map provide us unprecedented power to make and use maps in more sophisticated and creative ways. By taking advantage of these accessible web-based maps, students will explore new understandings of their communities that were not so visible and tangible without mapping. As an outcome, Jung hopes “Mapping Communities” project creates a community map of what is ‘understood’ and ‘known’ rather than what is merely 'seen.'

Robin Oppenheimer, Ph. C.

Lecturer, Part Time, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2010-2011
Project: Community Media Production

Robin Oppenheimer will teach a new IAS course called Community Media Production in Spring 2011 as part of the new Media and Communications Studies program. The goal of this course is to teach students basic digital video production skills in a real-life community-based collaboration with local non-profit organizations. By partnering with UWB’s Community-Based Learning and Scholarship Office (CBLS), student teams will work directly with local non-profits’ staff to research, write, direct, shoot, edit and produce a short advocacy video that supports the mission of the organization. They will learn about diverse community services provided by local non-profit organizations, as well as the basic economics and potential real-world applications of electronic media production. This class will also help the CBLS Office’s partner non-profits learn more about using communications tools. Staff will gain experience in electronic media production, exhibition, and distribution processes through their contact with the students.

Bryan White, Ph. D.

Lecturer, Science and Technology
I.C.B.L.R. Fellows 2010-2011
Project:  Sharing Human Anatomy and Physiology in Elementary Schools (SHAPES)

Bryan White is creating a community-based curriculum for his human anatomy class that will reflect on the nature of science without taking away from the scientific content of an upper level science course.  By partnering with local middle school and elementary school classrooms, UWB students will bring human organs into classrooms and lead small group discussions, asking for student observations and hypotheses, and reflecting on the nature of science throughout.  In addition, UWB students and partnering students will develop investigations on anatomy topics that interest partnering students, for example: What predicts when you lose a tooth?  What is the fastest way to increase heart rate?  Groups of students will work together to make hypotheses, develop experiments, generate data, and form conclusions while at the same time consider what it means to be a scientist.  The goal is to help UWB students and partnering students to think of themselves as scientists and practice the habits of science.

Dan Jacoby, Ph. D.

Professor; Director, Office of Institutional Research, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Academic Affairs
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2010-2011
BPOLST 401: Public Finance and Budgeting

The arts of public finance and budgeting involve financial and economic analysis.  These arts build on constituent skills in microeconomics and accounting so as to encourage government and other organizations to be efficient and effective in their use of scarce resources.  By saying that these tools are arts rather than sciences we admit to a certain level of judgment in their application because costs and benefits can never be fully revealed.  However, without some accepted tools enabling comparison and evaluation, politics would likely be reduced to raw power.  We’ll seek community sponsors who will involve us in some aspect of their budgeting process that will enable students not only to develop technical skills, but also to learn from the community what impact their expertise has upon the people served.  Through this intermediation we expect to increase students’ appreciation for the benefits of formal evaluation as well as sensitivity to its limits.  Students will be asked to write up an analysis of exactly these considerations with respect to the project they have undertaken.  That is, they will be asked, 1) What tools of analysis were used?  2) What tools of analysis should have been used and why? 3) Did your involvement with the community demonstrate specific weaknesses in formal budgetary evaluation?  4) If so, were those limitations so severe that the community would have been better off without using any formal tools of analysis?  5) Define the areas in which the critical judgments of experts are crucial, and what background one needs to make those judgments.

2009 - 2010 Fellows


Shauna Carlisle, Ph.D., MSW

Lecturer, IAS
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2009-2010
Project: Foundations of Social Service

Shauna Carlisle, will use a community based learning approach to develop, a course called Foundations of Social Services. This class will provide an introduction to social welfare, social services, and social policy. This course will build knowledge of poverty and inequality and explore social policy as a form of insurance and protection against hardship. Students will have an opportunity to work with a community organization to develop a policy proposal. The rational behind this course suggests its not enough to simply learn about social policy, but we need to engage. Students will learn how social policy is formulated, the assumptions behind social policy, and how social policy can change the human condition and empower those who have limited access. A community based learning approach provides an opportunity for students to work with a community organization to identify and draft a policy solution that agencies can use to advocate for the needs of their constituents.

Cheryl Cooke, Ph.D., RN

Assistant Professor, Nursing
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2008-2010
Project: Community, Prisons, and Health

Cheryl Cooke, an assistant professor in the nursing program, is using her ICBLS project to develop, present, and refine a course called "Community, Prisons, and Health". In this course, the effects of mass incarceration on individuals, families, and particularly, communities are examined. Some topics that explored in the course include how removing large numbers of individuals from families effect community capacity, health, economics, politics, and the potential for social action focused on community improvement. Various texts, media, and fieldwork experiences are used to explore historical and contemporary issues related to incarcerating large groups of people. The course was originally developed as a freestanding course, but is being revised as a two-part series of courses that also allow students to participate in a community-based project.

Lindsay Custer, Ph.D.

Director, Teaching and Learning Academy, Sociology Faculty, Cascadia Community College
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2009-2010
Project:

Dr. Lindsay Custer teaches sociology and global studies courses at Cascadia Community College. Her ICBLS project involves integrating community-based learning into a course called “Social Inequality.” By integrating community-based learning into this course, Lindsay hopes to “provide students with richer learning experiences, to expose them to various forms of oppression that they may not have encountered before, and to strategically incorporate service learning at a place in the curriculum where students are likely to encounter it at some point during their time at Cascadia Community College. For this project community partners will be selected based on whether or not they address the types of inequality being explored in the course (race/ethnicity, class, sex and gender, and sexuality). Potential community partners include: Hopelink, Habitat for Humanity, Eastside Domestic Violence Center, and Equal Rights Washington among others.

Benjamin Gardner, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2010
Project: Cultural Research, Community-Based Learning and Collaborative Practices

Dr. Gardner will incorporate a community based learning component as part of his IAS course Approaches to Cultural Research. "I believe students will greatly benefit by working closely with community partners to carry out meaningful cultural research projects." The optional 2-credit class will offer interested students enrolled in his course the opportunity to work with a community organization to design, carry out and present their research. "Integrating a community-based learning component will enable students, as well as myself to build relationships with community partners that can extend beyond the single quarter." By incorporating a community-based learning component students who want to work with local organizations will have the chance to engage real problems in the community, and experience the challenges and rewards of carrying out collaborative research. In addition, he is developing partnerships for learning and research examining the relationship between culture, politics and social change for the MACS and MAPS graduate programs.

Li Liu, Ph.C

Associate Faculty, Cascadia Community College
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2009-2010
Project name: Community interview project using digital-story-telling-technique

Li Liu will use community-based learning technique to develop and further refine details of a course she's been teaching for five quarters at Cascadia Community College, CMST 150, Multicultural Communication. In this course students will interview a community member coming from a different culture and record the conversation with digital cameras. Students will then edit the footage they've collected and towards the end of the quarter, share the digital film with community members and the entire class. The community-based learning approach enables Li to develop course assessment tools better reflecting and protecting benefits of community members, while scaffolding students learning experience through the interview process. Another obvious benefit of using community-based learning approach is that students are now able to compare and contrast textbook intercultural communication theories with real-life inter-cultural communication moments.

Robert J. Turner, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2009-2010
Project: Improving the Design, Dissemination, Continuity, and Assessment of Community-Based Research by UW Bothell Students in BES 318 and BIS 490

Dr. Turner has been engaging students in community-based research projects for as long as he has been teaching. This reflects his commitment to provide experiential learning opportunities for students that also provide some benefit to the community. In 2010 Dr. Turner will be incorporating community-based research projects in BES 318 – Hydrogeology, BIS 490 – Senior Seminar: Sustainability Research for Community Enhancement, BIS 392 – Water and Sustainability, and BES 303 – Environmental Monitoring Practicum. His ICBLR proposal is to take the community-based projects in these courses to the next level. Specifically, he will collaborate with the ICBLR Steering Committee and fellows to ensure that: 1) student project results are well packaged and well disseminated; 2) plans for continuing research projects and collaborations beyond 2010 are developed; and 3) student learning objectives are defined and their fulfillment assessed, along with community partner satisfaction.

2008 - 2009 Fellows


Cheryl Cooke, PhD, RN

Assistant Professor, Nursing
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2009
Project: Community, Prisons, and Health

Cheryl Cooke, an assistant professor in the nursing program, is using her ICBLR project to develop, present, and refine a course called "Community, Prisons, and Health". In this course, the effects of mass incarceration on individuals, families, and particularly, communities are examined. Some topics that explored in the course include how removing large numbers of individuals from families effect community capacity, health, economics, politics, and the potential for social action focused on community improvement. Various texts, media, and fieldwork experiences are used to explore historical and contemporary issues related to incarcerating large groups of people. The course was originally developed as a freestanding course, but is being revised as a two-part series of courses that also allow students to participate in a community-based project.

Jennifer Droege

Director, Student Life
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2009
Project: Expanding Out of Classroom Service Opportunities

Jennifer is working on developing standardized orientation and reflection guidelines for co-curricular community based activities. Building on the office's current work with Alternative Spring Break and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, the Office of Student Life is looking to expand service and community based activities outside of the classroom both locally and across the country. Guidelines for orientation and reflection will help ensure our students are entering communities responsibly and being thoughtful about the work they are doing. As expanded service opportunities begin to develop, Jennifer also looks forward to begin building relationships with community agencies in the local area. 

Benjamin Gardner, PhD

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2009
Project: Cultural Research, Community-Based Learning and Collaborative Practices

 Dr. Gardner will incorporate a community based learning component as part of his IAS course Approaches to Cultural Research. "I believe students will greatly benefit by working closely with community partners to carry out meaningful cultural research projects." The optional 2-credit class will offer interested students enrolled in his course the opportunity to work with a community organization to design, carry out and present their research. "Integrating a community-based learning component will enable students, as well as myself to build relationships with community partners that can extend beyond the single quarter." By incorporating a community-based learning component students who want to work with local organizations will have the chance to engage real problems in the community, and experience the challenges and rewards of carrying out collaborative research. In addition, he is developing partnerships for learning and research examining the relationship between culture, politics and social change for the MACS and MAPS graduate programs.

Keith Nitta, PhD

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2009
Project: Practicing Management and Leadership in Community-Based Team Projects

Dr. Nitta will integrate community-based learning into two Master of Arts in Policy Studies core courses, Management and Leadership, by pairing small teams of students with community organizations. Together, the student teams and community partners will identify priorities and create work plans. The goals are 1) to build long-term relationships between UWB and specific community partners by providing thoughtful, high-quality service over several years, 2) for students to practice team-building, diagnostic, and analytic skills in a supervised environment, and 3) for students to individually and collectively reflect on their own management and leadership development.

Jane Van Galen, PhD

Professor, Education
I.C.B.L.R. Fellow 2008-2009
Project: The Dream Project

Jane  Van Galen is faculty advisor to a new UWB initiative, the Dream Project. Based on a program begun at UW Seattle four years ago, the Dream Project prepares UWB students to mentor low income/first generation high school juniors and seniors through the process of choosing colleges and applying for admissions and financial aid. In the quarterly course, students learn about educational inequalities and access to higher education, social mobility, and education policy. In partnership with area high schools, the UWB students work with young people on admissions essays, scholarship searches, and on raising aspirations. The Dream Project also develops student leadership skills as students build the infrastructure of of the Dream Project via fundraising, materials development, and campus event planning. 

2007 - 2008 Fellows


Karen Gourd, PhD

Assistant Professor, Education
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2007-2008
Project: Forum Theater as Community-based Learning and Scholarship

Dr. Gourd is working on a project which will include the development of a course introducing forum theater as a tool for community-based teaching and learning as envisioned by Brazilian dramatist Augusto Boal. The purposes of this course are to learn to (1) facilitate forum theater, (2) use data collection techniques that allow students to understand issues from various community members' perspectives, (3) work as a team to develop a project and create a scene that represents issues relevant to a particular community, and (4) facilitate a successful forum theater event. Dr. Gourd's work with the I.C.B.L.S. will also allow her to become familiar with communities in the Puget Sound Region and to establish working connections within those communities.

Nicole Hoover

Director, Quantitative Skills Center
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2007-2008
Project: Bringing Quantitative Reasoning into Non-Math Courses

Nicole Hoover is using her time with the I.C.B.L.S. to create a new 2-credit service learning course to serve as a service learning practicum option for the University of Washington Bothell Education Department. Coursework will include a combination of after-school tutoring and group projects focused on designing a quantitative classroom activity and implementing it in a non-math course (i.e. social studies or science courses) at the 7th or 8th grade level. She will model the after-school tutoring component on her work within the Quantitative Skills Center, and anticipates that the class will enable University of Washington Bothell students to become familiar with the strengths and limitations of local junior high students, and to be able to design classroom activities accordingly.

Bruce Kochis, PhD

Senior Lecturer, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2007-2008
Project: Diasporas and Community Research

Dr. Kochis is developing a course which would "globalize" the University of Washington Bothell through using the knowledge and experience of international and non-native students. Given language abilities and cultural knowledge, these students will be able to make substantial contributions to the curriculum as guest speakers, as resources for faculty and other students, and as liaisons with the diaspora communities in the Puget Sound Region. This course will be offered regularly and will build strong and lasting bridges to the communities around the University of Washington Bothell as well as helping to identify this campus as an innovative locus of community-based scholarship.

Becca Price, PhD

Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2007-2008
Project: Collaborating with Local Instructors on Teaching Evolution

Dr. Price will incorporate community-based learning into an evolution course that she will launch in the 2008-2009 academic year. The goals are to (1) build a long-lasting collaboration with the primary and secondary schools to help teachers' improve their ability to teach evolution and (2) to establish a one-quarter collaboration between one or several classes in local public schools and University of Washington Bothell students in Evolution. The university students will address misconceptions through activities that they develop and tailor specifically to meet the younger students' needs. This approach will encourage everyone involved to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation for evolution based on inquiry guided by the identification of misconceptions.

2006 - 2007 Fellows


Bruce Burgett, PhD

Interim Director and Professor, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2006-2007
Project: Intersections of Sex and Race

Dr. Burgett used his time with the I.C.B.L.S. to revise his senior seminar, "Intersections of Sex and Race," in which students pursue and refine research questions related to the course rubric. His redesign provides students with the option of pursuing their research either through traditional academic methods or through fieldwork, with attention to balancing the two approaches and foregrounding the ways in which they interrelate. Beyond this course, he is developing learning and research-based partnerships with regional organizations working at the intersections of sex and race, which will be integrated into his undergraduate teaching in American Studies as well as the MACS and MAPS graduate programs.

David Goldstein, PhD

Interim Director, Teaching and Learning Center, Lecturer
Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2006-2007
Project: Development of a Community-based, Lower Division, Service Learning Course in Composition Tutoring

Dr. Goldstein's work with the I.C.B.L.S. led to the development of an on-campus seminar with a service-learning practicum in a community tutoring site. In the seminar, students studied scholarship on the writing process, examined the role of a writing tutor, and developed effective tutoring practices. In the practicum, students practiced and reflected upon community-based tutoring.

Andrea Kovalesky, RN, C, PhD

Assistant Professor, Nursing
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2006-2007
Project: Revision of Community-based Learning Activities in BNURS 409: Community Health Nursing

Dr. Kovalesky's participation in the cohort provided her with a wide range of perspectives on design and assessment resulting in the establishment of new community-based learning guidelines for a major core requirement in the newly revised Nursing curriculum. Dr. Kovalesky gathered input from key informants including Nursing program faculty at UW Bothell, UW Seattle, UW Tacoma and Pacific Lutheran University, and staff at several community health agencies.

Genevieve McCoy, PhD

Senior Lecturer, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2006-2007
Project: 200 Level Course on Migration and Acculturation

Dr. McCoy's project for the I.C.B.L.S. involved the creation of a 200-level class on migration and acculturation which aims to create greater awareness of how class, religious, gender, racial, linguistic, age, sexual orientation, as well as ethnic and national differences affect individuals, construct social stereotypes, and inform social, political, and economic policies. In addition to taking a historical approach to this issue, Dr. McCoy sought to incorporate service learning, internships, and/or projects that in some way require contact with organizations working with local immigrant communities or national immigrant organizations.

Nancy Place, PhD

Assistant Professor, Education
I.C.B.L.S. Fellow 2006-2007
Project: Reading Development and Instruction

While with the initiative Dr. Place developed a course titled "Reading Development and Instruction" which focuses on the ways that children learn to read and the ways that adults can help them in this process. By tutoring local school children, participants develop an experiential base for understanding theoretical perspectives gained through course readings and activities. Ideally, the class meetings and the tutoring would take place in a common community location and on a common day.